BAD GONE GOOD

No, I’m not crazy. Yes, the name of my new novel is GOOD GONE BAD, but I am writing about something else. I did the title switcheroo to make a point. Landrover Freelander in Snow by Dr. Joseph ValksHave you ever noticed how good things come out of bad things? I thought about that during the humongous snowstorm we had in the Southeast. It started last Tuesday morning in Charlotte and continued into the next day along with sleet and freezing rain. Although there was plenty of warning of the upcoming storm, it whisked into the city with the fierceness and veracity of Mother Nature on steroids. Motorists trying to get home jammed the main streets. Many had to abandon their vehicles while others relied on the help of good Samaritans to help get their vehicles unstuck from the ice and snow.
When the going gets tough, good people show up out of nowhere and do random acts of kindness. This is the part I like best: Whether the person in need is a friend or a stranger, we pull together to help one another. During a crisis, like this snowstorm, we work as one unit to be of assistance. It doesn’t matter what race, political party, religion, financial status, or dress code, we all have one thing in common. And that, my friend, is surviving the storm.
The Charlotte Observer printed an article by Mark Price that told of a man who helped two people. One was a man who spoke no English. That didn’t matter. The need was apparent, and this man did not hesitate to offer his help.
Also, in the article, it mentioned a woman who said that the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department were outstanding in going overboard to help as many people as they could. I’m sure that was the same for my town of Matthews, a few miles southeast of Charlotte. There was one incident where about a dozen CMPD officers pushed cars up a hill and directed traffic at the same time.
I have had the privilege to talk with many officers in the last year and in all of them I picked up on one thing they seem to have in common. They all want to be of service to others. The same goes for our firefighters, EMS, and countless others who work for modest pay to make our lives safer.
I’ll leave you with this reminder: Bad crisis gone. Good acts remain.
Help when you can and be thankful for the ones who help you.

Photo “Landrover Freelander in Snow” courtesy of Dr. Joseph Valks/freedigitalphotos.net

 

About Susan MIlls Wilson

Susan Mills Wilson is a native of North Carolina where she writes romantic suspense. She is the leader of the Charlotte Writers Club Mystery Critique Group and a member of Charlotte Writers Club. Subscribe to Susan’s blog at www.susanmillswilson.com.
This entry was posted in Law Enforcement and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.